Sting and Shaggy Have Made an Album Along, and It Probably Slaps BY SAEED NASIR


“Don’t Make Me Wait around,” the first solitary from ’44/876,’ will help people get pregnant, according to Shagy

Sting and Shaggy have made an album mutually. It’s called 44/876, and it’s out on 4/20. The first solo from the album, “Don’t Make Me Hold out,” is at the top of the page. It appears to be the way a sunburned person seems when they browse the words “BOTTOMLESS PI?A COLADAS–$3!” It’s a reggae-tinged pop song that only breaks out of its mellow when Shaggy sings, straightforwardly, in the first verse, “This is more if you ask me than simply gettin’ it.” It appears like a collaboration that was always designed to be, in its own unusual way: Sting, who fronted THE AUTHORITIES and used reggae rhythms to bring the band to superstardom; Shaggy, who, at his maximum, made a few of the largest reggae-pop crossover tunes of all time.

Rolling Rock ran a feature on the album’s creation this morning. Here is a section that I’ve read and reread several times while enabling the solo loop in my own headphones:

If they seem like an unlikely set, it’s hard to imagine two different people more delighted by each other’s company. Shaggy grabs a container of Ting–Jamaican grapefruit soda–out of the fridge: “Remember while i advised you about Ting? We gotta get something to mix this with.” Sting contains the bottle up next to his face, breaking Shaggy up with the Sting-Ting interconnection, and asks, “Did you start to see the lyrics I dispatched you today?”

And, a little later:

A bottle of Jamaican white rum appears, and Shaggy sets to mixing up drinks for the team. The engineer cues up “Don’t Make Me Wait around” and the dancehall legend cheerfully sings along. He offers his assessment as the melody ends: “Doesn’t that just appear to be something that a huge selection of women would get pregnant to?”

This recording will flavor like Ting and white rum; it’ll feel like the ocean breeze; it will move you, momentarily, to a half-decent hotel somewhere. This record will, in all likelihood, slap.

Plus, if Shaggy is right–and I’m inclined to trust him–hundreds of very chill newborns will be created nine weeks from today.